Student Kills 14: Manhunt Under Way After Prague University Shooting

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Prague, a city steeped in history and charm, became a scene of unimaginable horror. Jakob Weizman, a Danish student at Charles University, found himself trapped in an exam room, the chilling symphony of gunshots and screams shattering his sense of security.

His initial shock stemmed not just from the immediate danger, but from the realization that a tragedy once confined to American headlines had crossed the Atlantic, seeping into the heart of Europe.

“I lived in the US for a long time,” he told CNN with a voice strained by disbelief. “If it were to happen anywhere, I thought it would be there. Now, it’s spreading like a disease” he said.

His words reflected a growing unease across Europe, a continent that had come to see itself as an island of relative safety amidst the American storm of gun violence. But the specter of mass shootings, once a distant echo, had materialized on their doorstep, in Denmark, Serbia, and now, with chilling immediacy, in Prague.

Weizman and his professor, their hearts pounding, barricaded themselves inside the exam room. Each passing minute felt like an eternity, punctuated only by the faint echoes of screams and the frantic whispers of hope. For an hour, they waited, prisoners in their own sanctuary, until the sirens pierced the silence, heralding the arrival of rescuers.

The gunman, a 24-year-old student shrouded in the fog of his motives, had claimed at least 14 lives and wounded 25, leaving behind a landscape of shattered dreams and a nation grappling with the weight of unthinkable grief.

The specter of stricter regulations loomed large, a question mark hanging over a nation where over 300,000 people legally own guns. Prague’s nightmare served as a mirror reflecting the stark reality of America’s gun crisis. With 120 guns for every 100 citizens, the United States stands alone in its struggle with firearm violence.

Over 642 mass shootings this year alone paint a harrowing picture of a nation drowning in its own guns. The ripple effect, however, had now reached Europe’s shores, a chilling reminder that no continent is immune to this epidemic.

Jakob Weizman’s experience stands as a powerful testament to the devastating impact of gun violence. It is a story that transcends borders, languages, and cultures, a cautionary tale etched in the tears of a continent no longer able to ignore the echoes of America’s tragedy. The question now remains: will Europe learn from the mistakes of the past, or will the Prague shooting be just another echo, fading into the night only to return with renewed horror?

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